S-I Projects

Facilitating 3D scans of the collection using photogrammetry


S-I Projects 3d Scanning

3D photogrammetry:  Innovations to capture the materiality and texture of the objects

Ben Waters on computer
Use of 3D photogrammetry software

Ben Waters, architect and co-founder of S-I Projects, brought a unique background to the project, the focus of which was on the process of creating a 3D object sensitive to the presentation of cultural heritage.

S-I Projects was engaged to digitize the objects in the Built Heritage Collection using 3D photogrammetry. Due to the wide variation in size and material of the objects, a key part of the process was to assess the objects in order to capture them without losing any of their detail. The S-I Projects team were constantly having to adapt their equipment set-up and innovate to get the best results.

3D object in computer
3D scanned object in computer processing software

Ben describes  photogrammetry as fantastic for allowing close engagement with detailed objects. It works especially well with this collection as there are so many varieties of scale, material and texture. As the 3D scan of the object is overlaid with the textural ‘skin’, there is an option in the Pedestal platform to turn off the texture and to view the 3D model, allowing the viewer to see the underlying structure of the object and its geometry more clearly.

Ben Waters setting up camera
Setting up of photogrammetry capture on turnstile

S-I projects sees the future of design as being an intersection of physical and virtual content, where architects and designers solve complex problems for the organization of cultural content. That might mean not necessarily designing a building or a space, but rather engaging with the organization of digital information at various forms of interaction and experiences.

S-I Projects

S-I Projects is a design studio that helps people and institutions navigate the increasingly blurred boundaries between material and digital culture.

We work with museums, galleries and universities to digitise and visualise cultural histories. We also work with contemporary brands to design sensory environments that merge the virtual and the physical.

We have expertise in technical services such as 3D scanning and virtual production. But, as designers and architects, we take that much further. We solve complex problems for organising cultural content. In short, we make sense of a world where reality and representation are seamless.

Ben Waters at computer

Ben describes the photogrammetry as fantastic for allowing close engagement with detailed objects, and this works especially well with this collection as there are so many different small varieties of scale, materials and textures. As the 3D scan of the object is overlaid with the textural ‘skin’, there is an option in the Pedestal platform to turn off the texture and to view the 3D model, allowing you to see the underlying structure of the object and its geometry more clearly.

Brick in computer program

SI projects sees the future of design as being an intersection of physical and virtual content, where architects and designers solve complex problems for the organization of cultural content. That might mean that you're not necessarily designing a building or a space but you're engaging with the organization of digital information at various forms of interaction and experiences.

Ben Waters with camera